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Man versus Rooster

A memoir by award winning journalist and Boston Globe writer Brian McGrory, Buddy: How a Rooster Made Me a Family Man is a moving and funny account of one man's journey from bachelor to husband and stepfather, aided by a menagerie of pets - including a cute baby chick who turned out to be a rooster. As a self-proclaimed animal lover, I found myself shedding a tear one minute and snorting with laughter the next as I read about the author's transition from a city dwelling, globetrotting single guy to a life in the suburbs as a family man.

A favorite book of mine--Gilead by Marilynne Robinson

Gilead is a quiet, reflective book about things of the heart and spirit—forgiveness and the relationship between father and son. John Ames is an elderly pastor in the small town of Gilead, Iowa in the 1950s. He had a son late in life and is writing down his thoughts and memories for his son so that his son will know about his family and heritage. Pastor Ames is the grandson and son of preachers. His grandfather had been a fiery abolitionist preacher before the Civil War and his father a pacifist preacher. His best friend is Robert Boughton, also a pastor in Gilead.

Did You Know…....May is “Get Caught Reading” Month?

Launched by the Association of American Publishers, "Get Caught Reading" is a nationwide public service campaign to remind people of all ages how much fun it is to read – not only in the month of May, but all year long. Why not let the library help you "get caught"? Reading is a central part of what the library is all about. We have loads of titles, sure to please any reader. Feel like browsing for new authors to try? Stop in and check out our display of hand-picked staff favorites near the main staircase. We pulled our favorite fiction and nonfiction titles just for you.

A Fascination with Lighthouses

Lighthouses are settings for a number of novels. People are fascinated by the mystery surrounding such remote places. Two recent novels that have lighthouse settings are: Light between Oceans by M. L. Stedman and Edge of the Earth by Christina Schwarz.

The Supremes at Earl’s All-You-Can-Eat

The title of this book intrigued me from the moment I first saw it. I enjoy reading books with settings in the South, and this title is as Southern as it gets. The Supremes at Earl's All-You-Can-Eat is set in a fictional town in southern Indiana called Plainview. Reminiscent of The Help, this debut novel by Edward Kelsey Moore is filled with the charm and wit of the South. As African American teenagers in the late 1960's, Clarice, Barbara Jean, and Odette hung out with most of their peers in a diner called Earl's.

"I need a book for my book club."

Book club members are often faced with the problem of getting enough copies of a title for members to read at the same time. If you belong to a book club, you should know about the Library’s book club kits. Each kit contains 10 copies of a title plus book discussion questions. The kits can be checked out for 60 days. Since most clubs meet monthly, one member can check out the kit, pass out copies to members at the meeting, and collect the copies at the next meeting after discussing the book. Right now there are about 60 titles available with more being added.

Are You a Dawdler or a Lollygagger?

Did you put off filing your income taxes until the last minute again this year? Do you continually struggle with deadlines, surf the Web instead of paying the bills, and prefer distraction to action? If so, I have the perfect self-help book for you. The Art of Procrastination, written by John Perry, an emeritus professor of philosophy at Stanford University, claims to be the effective guide to the art of dawdling, lollygagging and postponing.

Patron Saint of Lost Dogs

If you like books featuring animal/human relationships such as those by James Herriot, Susan Wilson, and W. Bruce Cameron, or if you like books with quirky characters, humor, and a touch of romance such as those by Fannie Flagg and Anne Tyler, then you probably would enjoy this warm and fuzzy debut novel from a veterinarian who wrote two memoirs, Tell Me Where It Hurts and Love Is the Best Medicine.

The Power Trip by Jackie Collins

Fun, fast, and trashy, with delicious characters skillfully woven into a complex plot and set against glitz and glamour, The Power Trip by Jackie Collins contains just the right amount of sex, mystery, greed and murder to make it the bestseller that it is. Five dynamic, powerful, and famous couples set sail on Russian billionaire Aleksandr Kasianenko's luxury yacht off the coast of Cabo San Lucas. Each of the couples accepted the coveted invitation for the cruise for their own - mostly selfish - reasons.

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

When I read Ready Player One it reminded me of a cross between the last Harry Potter book and Hunger Games with the same premise of a lone teen battling evil. The book is set in the United States in the year 2044 when things have gone bad due to climate change and poverty. Wade Watts is an impoverished 18-year-old orphan living in a vertical trailer park called the “stacks”. He has rigged up a junked van as his sanctuary where he can log into his virtual school and spend all of his free time in the virtual world of OASIS.

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