Staff Picks

Like visiting an old friend

I finished reading Love Letters by Debbie Macomber this weekend and it felt like I was visiting an old friend. I say that because with an old friend you know what to expect, you are always entertained and rarely disappointed. Love Letters is the third book in the Rose Harbor series (a spin-off of her Cedar Cove series) and is just as good as the two previous books. As usual, Macomber creates interesting and complicated characters that you grow to care about. Her writing truly touches your emotions, happy and sad, and that is a wonderful gift not all authors have.

How well do you know your child?

Finding Jake by Bryan Reardon is about a father who wrestles with this question when his son Jake is a suspect in a school shooting. Simon is a stay-at-home father to two children while his wife Rachel has a job as an attorney. Jake, the older of their children, is bright, quiet, and doesn’t like crowds. Laney, the younger child, thrives in social situations. Jake is a good big brother to his sister. Jake follows his father’s advice to be nice to people and befriends Doug.

A big story in a little book

Silver Thaw by Catherine Anderson might be a small paperback book but there is nothing small about the story within its covers. It gives a moving and terrifying view into the world of abuse as it follows a woman and her child as they escape from an abusive marriage and their struggle to survive without being found. You will be hooked from the first few chapters as little by little they both learn to trust and finally live and love again.

The next Gone Girl?

The Girl on the Train by Paula Hawkins is on the bestseller list and had much interest before it was published because it was described as the next Gone Girl. I found the book hard to put down once I started reading it. It is not exactly like Gone Girl in plot or characters, but if you enjoy suspenseful books with unreliable narrators, then you will like The Girl on the Train. Main character Rachel takes the train to London every day.

Laugh and cry with Wisconsin author Lesley Kagen

Wisconsin author Lesley Kagen, who wrote the popular books Whistling in the Dark and Good Graces, has 2 new books with Milwaukee area settings. The first is a novella, The Undertaking of Tess, and the second is a novel, The Resurrection of Tess Blessing. The Undertaking of Tess is set in Milwaukee in August 1959.

Accidents of Marriage by Randy Susan Meyers

Accidents of Marriage by Randy Susan Meyers was one of those books that I simply could not put down. I was drawn into the story from the beginning and found myself emotionally tied up in the struggles of each character. The story starts out describing a somewhat dysfunctional marriage, but soon turns into a very revealing and emotional tale of how a family survives a major crisis. The author skillfully tells the story from three different viewpoints through alternating chapters and blends them beautifully showing the depths of this family's love, hope, and despair.

Mammy from Gone with the Wind has her own story

Donald McCaig has written an authorized novel from Margaret Mitchell’s Gone with the Wind. Ruth’s Journey tells the story of Mammy. If you like Gone with the Wind or the author’s previous novel, Rhett Butler’s People, or historical fiction with 19th century settings, you will like Ruth’s Journey. In the early 1800s, Augustin and Solange arrive on the French colony of Saint-Domingue just as a revolution is breaking out.

Valentine's Day is mere days away

It is almost here people - the most romantic day of the year. Valentine's Day is mere days away and love and romance is in the air at the Fond du Lac Public Library. If reading romance is your thing, stop in and check out our "Sweet and Spicy" display, filled with romance books ranging from classic romance to paranormal romantic suspense.

Agatha Christie’s Hercule Poirot returns

The estate of Agatha Christie authorized this new book The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah. If you are a fan of Agatha Christie, you will enjoy this new tale featuring the sleuth Hercule Poirot. Poirot is at Pleasant’s Coffee House when a woman named Jennie comes in and tells him she is afraid that she will be murdered and that she deserves to die.

A real-life fairy tale romance...sigh

Sometimes a real-life story reads very much like fiction, and I think Seven Letters from Paris: a Memoir by Samantha Verant is a perfect example of a modern day fairy tale come true. The author shares her personal story of how a bundle of seven romantic love letters from her past lead her to pick herself up when her life was at its lowest and reach for the happiness she deserves. She tells it all - the good, the bad and the ugly - with just the right amount of humor mixed in.

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