Readers

A romantic tale with a naughty title

You can't help but get caught up in the drama-filled life of Quinn Barton in Beth Harbison's latest book with the somewhat naughty title. Perfect for lighthearted chick lit fans, Chose the Wrong Guy, Gave Him the Wrong Finger is a tale of unrequited love, but told in a way that makes it funny, light, and romantic, with just enough seriousness to not be fluffy.

Rosie Project Is Like Reading a Romantic Comedy Movie

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion is a humorous story of a man finding love. Don Tillman is a professor of genetics at an Australian university. He is extremely intelligent, quirky and probably has Asperger Syndrome. His only friends are Gene, also a professor and a philanderer, and Gene’s wife Claudia, a clinical psychologist. Don decides he wants a wife and gets advice from Gene and Claudia. He makes a questionnaire to weed out smokers and those who are chronically late. Then Rosie comes into his life. She smokes and is chronically late.

Spooktacular Reads

Are you a fan of thrills, chills, and things that go bump in the night? With Halloween right around the corner, it is the perfect time to check out some spooky reads to get you in the "spirit" of things? Here are a few of my suggested titles. Be careful, read a few of these and you may have to sleep with the lights on!

Asylum by John Harwood

The Bond between Dogs and Humans

Right now we are celebrating Fond du Lac Reads with the book Thunder Dog by Michael Hingson. Mr. Hingson is a blind man who was in the World Trade Center on 9/11 and survived with the help of his guide dog Roselle. Dogs do not have to be service dogs or therapy dogs to have a big effect on our lives. If you are a dog lover, you know what I mean. Books that highlight the dog/human bond are on display at the Library in conjunction with Fond du Lac Reads.

What would you do?

If you knew you were dying, what would you do? What would you see? Who would you spend your last year with? Susan Spencer-Wendel faced these decisions at forty-four years old when she was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) - Lou Gehrig's disease - an irreversible condition that systematically destroys the nerves that power the muscles. She shares her story in Until I Say Goodbye: My Year of Living With Joy.

Mourning Hours by Paula Treick DeBoard

Set in rural Manitowoc County mainly during 1994-1995, Mourning Hours tells the story of what happened after teenager Stacy Lemke disappeared in an early March snowstorm. Although in the end the mystery is solved, the story is more about how her disappearance affected the Hammarstrom family and the community. The tone of the book is tense as the strain on the family causes their lives together to come apart. Paula Treick DeBoard’s details of life in rural Wisconsin ring true, and her characters are realistic and believable.

You CAN Go Home Again

Remember the old saying "you can't go home again"? Well, it certainly does not apply to Liza Palmer's newest book, Nowhere but Home. Though it is about trying to return home to a life left behind, the author takes some very serious subjects and manages to weave them into an emotional tale that is even lighthearted in some ways.

Bone Season by Samantha Shannon

Here is an adult book for people who liked the Hunger Games and Harry Potter series. Bone Season is set in the year 2059 in an alternate history version of England. Two hundred years ago there was an influx of clairvoyant people who can connect to the aether--the realm of spirits. England is controlled by a totalitarian organization called Scion which is trying to eradicate clairvoyants. The main character is nineteen-year-old Paige Mahoney who is a rare type of clairvoyant called a dreamwalker.

The Widow Waltz by Sally Koslow

The beach scene with the cute little dog in a sweater might make you think it is a light beach read. Take my word for it, The Widow Waltz by Sally Koslow is anything but. It is a story of a wife and two daughters trying to move on after the death of their husband and father. It is hard enough to lose a loved one, but what if you discover the loved one you are grieving was not the person you thought they were, and the life of luxury you have been living is all based on lies?

A book for Star Wars fans: William Shakespeare's Star Wars

What? William Shakespeare and Star Wars? Yes! Ian Doescher, with the cooperation of George Lucas, has written the story of the original Star Wars movie, A New Hope, in iambic pentameter in the style of a Shakespeare play. The language is fun to read with plenty of “thou” and “prithee” among the references to “droids” and “hyperspace”. It’s not really such a stretch to put Shakespeare and Star Wars together. Both the Star Wars movies and Shakespeare’s plays are epic tales with villains and colorful supporting characters.

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